Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Jolly carrots dance to the Horse Lords on the gig poster of the week

Posted By today at 07.00 AM

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ARTIST: Andy Burkholder
SHOW: Horse Lords, Fire-Toolz, and Famous Laughs at Hideout on Sat 6/10
MORE INFO: andyburkholder.com

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Aldermen agree to install 30 more surveillance cameras around Wrigley Field after Manchester bombing, and other Chicago news

Posted By today at 06.00 AM

David Ross of the Chicago Cubs waves to the crowd at Wrigley Field in 2016. - PHOTO BY STACY REVERE/GETTY IMAGES
  • Photo by Stacy Revere/Getty Images
  • David Ross of the Chicago Cubs waves to the crowd at Wrigley Field in 2016.

Welcome to the Reader's morning briefing for Wednesday, May 24, 2017.

  • Aldermen agree to install 30 more surveillance cameras around Wrigley Field after Manchester bombing

The City Council's Budget Committee voted to use a $1 million grant from the Cubs to install 30 more surveillance cameras around Wrigley Field Tuesday morning, just hours after 22 people were killed by a bomb at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England. Chicago's Office of Emergency Management and Communications will monitor the cameras, which will be attached to light poles owned by the city, according to the Sun-Times. [Sun-Times]

  • Toni Preckwinkle will run for reelection as Cook County Board president next year

Cook County Board president Toni Preckwinkle will run for a third term in 2018, she announced during a pair of radio interviews. Preckwinkle has been widely considered a frontrunner to run for mayor in 2019, but she avoided a question about the mayoral race, saying, "I got this job in 2010. I was fortunate enough to be reelected in 2014. I will seek reelection one more time." [Tribune]

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Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Vibist Paris Smith is an undiscovered treasure of Chicago underground jazz

Posted By on 05.23.17 at 04:43 PM


Since 2004 Plastic Crimewave (aka Steve Krakow) has used the Secret History of Chicago Music to shine a light on worthy artists with Chicago ties who've been forgotten, underrated, or never noticed in the first place. Older strips are archived here.
 


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Coverage of Trump is negative—for good reason

Posted By on 05.23.17 at 02:53 PM

Members of the media and White House staff watched as Marine One departed from the South Lawn of the White House Friday. - AP PHOTO/ANDREW HARNIK
  • AP Photo/Andrew Harnik
  • Members of the media and White House staff watched as Marine One departed from the South Lawn of the White House Friday.
Not for the first time—or the second or third—the Chicago Tribune's John Kass maintained in his weekend column that the "news media leans ridiculously far to the left" and that the "tone of the coverage of President Donald Trump is over-the-top hostile." What Kass brought to the column that was new was the authority of Harvard University. He cited a new study by Harvard's Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics, and Public Policy reporting that in Trump's first 100 days in office, "Trump's coverage . . . set a new standard for negativity. Of news reports with a clear tone, negative reports outpaced positive ones by 80 percent to 20 percent."

Kass is welcome to his opinion, which isn't groundless. But if he thinks the Shorenstein study seconds it he should go back and reread the study.
Kass blurs the difference between "negativity" and "hostility"—which is a word Shorenstein didn't use. As a for instance, recall Trump's first days in office, when he claimed his inauguration was attended by vast throngs of well-wishers that photographs clearly showed didn't exist. News stories pointing this out were negative by Shorenstein's standards, but if they were also hostile, it was only by Kass's. He wasn't simply reading his colleagues' copy; he was trying to read their hearts.

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At long last the African music from Ali and Foreman’s ‘Rumble in the Jungle’ sees release

Posted By on 05.23.17 at 12:00 PM

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Ever since I saw the wonderful 1996 documentary When We Were Kings, about the legendary 1974 "Rumble in the Jungle" between Muhammad Ali and George Foreman in the Congo (formerly Zaire), I've been curious about the prefight concert, which took place over three nights in Kinshasa. The fight itself ended up delayed by five weeks after Foreman sustained a cut near his eye while sparring, but the music went on as planned on the original dates, September 22 through 24, drawing a crowd of 50,000. Billed as Zaire 74, the Kinshasa event mixed marquee names from American soul, blues, and R&B—including James Brown, B.B. King, the Spinners, Bill Withers, and the Crusaders—and Latin-music heavies Celia Cruz & the Fania All-Stars with a top-flight roster of Congolese talent. The original film touched lightly on the concerts, but another great movie, 2009's Soul Power, gave the music its own showcase. Unfortunately, the film focused almost exclusively on the visiting artists, with scant mention of the locals.

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Durbin compares Trump to former governor Rod Blagojevich, and other Chicago news

Posted By on 05.23.17 at 06:00 AM

President Donald Trump is seated during the Arab Islamic American Summit in Saudi Arabia. - MANDEL NGAN/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
  • MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images
  • President Donald Trump is seated during the Arab Islamic American Summit in Saudi Arabia.

Welcome to the Reader's morning briefing for Tuesday, May 23, 2017.

  • Durbin calls Trump "a president who clearly is not taking advice from anybody," compares him to Rod Blagojevich

Senator Dick Durbin warned his fellow Democrats not to "hang" President Donald Trump before special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia, and compared Trump to former Illinois governor Rod Blagojevich. "If you're fair-minded and committed to the rule of law, then you don't hang the person before the trial, which is what some of my political colleagues want to do," Durbin said on WGN Radio. "I think that is fundamentally unfair, and we need to let this run its course." The Senate minority whip also said that Trump "is a president who clearly is not taking advice from anybody. The only analogy I can think of was when our former governor Blagojevich was really in trouble with impeachment and other things brewing, and he took off for New York to appear on television shows." [Tribune]

  • Bank of America: Apple is almost 40 percent more valuable than Chicago

Apple Inc. is so valuable that it has surpassed the economic value of Chicago by 38 percent, according to a new report from Bank of America-Merrill Lynch. The computer giant's market capitalization was about $803 billion in 2016, which is 38 percent larger than Chicago's real gross domestic product of $581 billion for that year. Google's parent company, Alphabet, has a market capitalization of $657.9 billion, which is about 13 percent higher than Chicago's GDP. New York City and Los Angeles have much larger GDPs than Chicago, but Apple is only about 4 percent away from surpassing LA's economic value. [MarketWatch]

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Monday, May 22, 2017

Watch Saint Lou’s Assembly chef Carlos Cruz make a ‘land caviar’ dish that really pops

Posted By on 05.22.17 at 03:52 PM

"Land caviar" is a common nickname for tonburi—the seed of a plant known as kochia or burning bush, among other names. In Japan, the seeds are considered a delicacy similar to caviar and used as a garnish for sushi; in China they're used in traditional medicine. Chef Carlos Cruz of Saint Lou's Assembly, challenged by John Kirchner of GT Prime to create a dish with tonburi, says, "It wasn't what I expected. There's not that much flavor to it."

"Everyone talks about how it's like caviar, it pops in your mouth," Cruz says. "It does pop in your mouth just a little, but it's not extreme." The tiny seeds are dried and boiled before being placed in jars and sold commercially; they're typically served as is, but Cruz went to great lengths to bring out their flavor. "I've tried toasting it, fermenting it, even blooming it," he says. Cruz compares the smell to tea. What little flavor there is, he says, is grassy and earthy.

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Brockmire won’t make America great again

Posted By on 05.22.17 at 02:57 PM

Brockmire
  • Brockmire

Jim Brockmire is a fitting TV hero for America in 2017. He's a famous baseball announcer who disappears from public view after an on-air meltdown, then attempts to resurrect his life and career as the voice of a struggling minor-league team in a dying rust-belt town. Brockmire's longing for a quaint rose-tinted past that never existed and his vulgar means of getting what he wants are an apt reflection of the country right now. But that doesn't mean Brockmire is a good TV show.

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Laura Kipnis talks sex on campus, the House Music Conference, and more things to do in Chicago his week

Posted By on 05.22.17 at 01:20 PM

Laura Kipnis discusses her book Unwanted Advances: Sexual Paranoia Comes to Campus on Tue 5/23 and Wed 5/24. - LUCY HEWETT
  • Lucy Hewett
  • Laura Kipnis discusses her book Unwanted Advances: Sexual Paranoia Comes to Campus on Tue 5/23 and Wed 5/24.

There's plenty to do this week. Here's some of what we recommend:

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City introduces pro-immigrant ‘One Chicago’ campaign in response to Trump administration policies, and other news

Posted By on 05.22.17 at 10:11 AM

Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Mexico City mayor Miguel Mancera watch as new American citizens are sworn in during a naturalization ceremony May 5. - PHOTO BY SCOTT OLSON/GETTY IMAGES
  • Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images
  • Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Mexico City mayor Miguel Mancera watch as new American citizens are sworn in during a naturalization ceremony May 5.

Welcome to the Reader's morning briefing for Monday, May 22, 2017.

  • City introduces pro-immigrant "One Chicago" campaign in response to Trump administration policies

The city has launched the pro-immigrant "One Chicago" campaign with the slogan: "Three million residents, three million stories, one Chicago." The campaign is a response to President Donald Trump and his administration's threats to stop funding sanctuary cities, including Chicago, that decline to cooperate with federal agencies seeking to deport undocumented immigrants. "With the new administration, everybody lives in fear," immigrant Angel Castillo said at the program's launch Sunday. "Since its founding in 1837, families from around the country and throughout the world have made Chicago their home," Congressman Luis Gutierrez said. "The 'One Chicago' campaign works to celebrate those different journeys while uniting their voices as one people, one home, and one city." [CNN] [NBC Chicago]

  • Emanuel reveals plan to borrow $389 million to keep CPS schools open

Mayor Rahm Emanuel revealed his plan to borrow $389 million in order to keep Chicago Public Schools in session through the end of the 2016-2017 school year and to make a payment to the teachers' pension fund Friday. The Chicago Board of Education will have to approve the city's borrowing $389 million and borrowing against the $467 million that Illinois owes the district this week. [DNAinfo Chicago]

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